“Lizzy’s eyes began to drift shut as they passed by the weary men shuffling along the shoulder. She did not see their bowed backs nor the overseers on horseback who were armed with truncheons and whips.” (Ch IV, In Plain Sight)

Fitzwilliam Darcy’s father withered until his son was forced to become Pemberley’s Master. Brandy numbed his pain but allowed Darcy’s worst inclinations to run wild. Then a tragedy demanded he erase his identity until he once again could honor his family name.

Elizabeth Bennet, young gentlewoman from Meryton, had been schooled by her father to observe, but not to see. Her impairment was not willful but rather inbred, a symptom of class divisions between those who served and those who were served.

“In Plain Sight” explores Jane Austen’s greatest love story by flipping social roles on their head. As Darcy must grow past his old prideful nature before he can be worthy of her admiration, so, too, must Elizabeth break through her own prejudices to capture the treasure hidden in plain sight.

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